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These great instructions come to us from Cornhole Game Players forum member Milky. He was one of the first to create how-to build instructions for these hole-only Cornhole Boards. Players generally play with these sets as a way to increase accuracy and show their skill.

For instructions to help you build a set of these yourself, download Milky’s Bomb Droppin’ Box Instructions.

Material List:

  • –1 qty, 4′ x 4′ x 3/4 inch sheet of plywood
  • –24 qty, 2 1/2″ exterior screws
  • –Sandable, stainable, paintable wood filler
  • –1 qty, sheet of 80 grit sandpaper
  • –1 qty, sheet of 220 grit sandpaper
  • –Wood glue, preferably Gorilla Glue
  • –Moist rag or tack cloth

Tools list:

  • –Drill
  • –Circular or table saw
  • –Tape measure
  • –Pencil
  • –Putty knife
  • –1/8″ drill bit
  • –Screwdriver bit to match the head of the screws
  • –Whatever tool you prefer to cut a 6″ hole into 3/4″ plywood

“Bomb-Droppin’ Box” directions

Start by measuring out and marking off the 6 pieces of wood you will need to make your box. You need to cut the following pieces:(See picture #1)

  • –1 qty, 18″ x 18″ (Base)
  • –1 qty, 16″ x 16″ (Top deck)
  • –2 qty, 12″ x 9 1/2″ (Sides of frame)
  • –1 qty, 10 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ (Back of frame)
  • –1 qty, 10 1/2″ x 8″ (Front of frame)

You will have a large piece of wood left over. Unfortunately, there’s no way to make this box with just a 2′ x 4′ piece. It can be made with a 2′ x 4′ piece, and a 2′ x 2′ piece, but the price for those two pieces together is typically more than the price of a 4′ x 4′ piece. (See suggested layout)

Get your 2 identical 12″ x 9 1/2″ pieces. Measure up 8″ from the bottom along one side and make a mark along the edge. Draw a line starting from the 9 1/2″ corner to the 8″ mark you just made. (See picture # 2) Cut along this line so that now you have two slanted pieces of wood, with the dimensions of 12″ long, 9 1/2″ high in the back, and 8″ high in the front. Repeat this process for the other piece of 12″ x 9 1/2″ piece. These will be the sides of your box. Set all these pieces aside for now.

Get your 18 ” x 18″ base piece. You need to mark off where the frame will sit on the base. To have your frame centered, it will need to sit at 4″ in from all sides. Measure in 4″ from each side, then draw a square with your pencil. (See picture # 3) Now, measure in 3/4″ from the sides of the square you just drew. Draw this square as well. You should now have a “footprint” of exactly where your frame will sit on your base. (See picture # 3 again) Turn the base over and repeat these steps so you have the same exact “footprint” on the other side. Set this piece aside for now.

Get your 16″ x 16″ top deck piece. You need to mark off where this will sit on your frame. To have it centered, the frame will need to be 2″ in from all sides. Measure in 2″ from each side, then draw a square with your pencil. (Refer to picture # 3 again) Now, measure in 3/4″ from the sides of the square you just drew. Draw this square as well. You should now have a “footprint” of exactly where your top deck will sit on your frame. Turn the top deck over and repeat these steps so you have the same exact “footprint” on the other side. Set this piece aside for now.

You are now ready to assemble your frame. Note that the dimensions of your frame should be 12″ x 12″ square when assembled, with the slanted sides slanting in the same direction, obviously. Apply some glue to the parts of the frame pieces that will touch each other, taking care to make sure all sides are flush with one another. You’ll need some pressure on all four sides, in order to hold the pieces together while the glue dries. You can use paint cans, or books, or of course clamps if you have them. You don’t have to wait until the glue fully dries. You can if you want to, but the glue step is more or less just a helpful tool to keep the frame in place while you drill your pilot holes and sink yur screws.

Get your drill and your 1/8″ drill bit. You need to drill pilot holes into the sides of your frame. Drill 2 holes along each 8″ side and 2 holes along each 9 1/2″ side, for a total of 4 holes per side. Get your screwdriver bit, 8 screws, and screw just the frame together. (See picture # 4) Congratulations, your frame is now assembled.

Apply glue to the bottom of your frame, and sit it on the footprint your drew on your base. (See picture # 5) Allow the glue some time to dry. When the glue is dry, turn the whole project over, so the frame is resting on your table, and the bottom of the base is now facing you. You should be staring at the 2nd footprint you drew earlier. Get your drill again and drill two pilot holes along each side, in the center of the footprint, to ensure that the screws will go into the center of the frame underneath. Get your screwdriver bit, 8 screws, and screw the base onto the frame. (See picture # 6) ***SPECIAL NOTE*** If your measurements and footprint drawing are exact, you should be screwing right into the center of the 3/4″ wood you made your frame out of. If you’re not 100% confident about your measurement skills, sink your first few screws slowly, checking to see that they are indeed going into the center of the frame’s wood. Make minor adjustments as necessary.

Turn the whole project back over so it is sitting right side up. Sit this aside for now.

Get your top deck piece of wood. You’ll need to mark off the center of this piece in order to find where to make your 6″ hole. The center should be 8″ in from all sides. Mark this spot. Use your preferred tool to make your 6″ hole. I use a 6″ hole saw. (See picture # 7 and picture # 8)

Once you have your hole made, you need to attach your top deck to your frame. Decide what side of the wood you want to use as the top surface. Apply glue to the footprint you drew on the other side, and attach the top deck to your frame. You will want to apply downward pressure to ensure that when the glue dries, your top deck is still centered on the frame.

Get your drill and drill two pilot holes on each side, in the center of your footprint. Sink your screws, again using caution to make sure that your measurements are correct, and your screws are going into the center of the frame below. Congratulations, your Bomb-Dropping Box is built! (See picture # 9)

Paint/design preparation:

Apply wood filler to each screw hole, then level and smooth out with your putty knife. Wait for the wood filler to dry(refer to side of container). Take your 80 grit sandpaper and sand down the entire box. Remove all debris with a moist rag or tack cloth. Take your 220 grit sandpaper and sand down the entire box until it’s smooth as can be and all imperfections have been addressed. Don’t forget to sand around the inside, underside, and topside of the hole. Splinters and rough edges will considerably shorten the life of your bags. Design, paint and/or stain as you prefer. Have fun!

****NOTES*****

–These plans are based on the specifications of a regulation Cornhole board. Following these directions and using these materials will essentially leave you with a 16″ x 16″ cross section of a regulation Cornhole board. The heights will be the same and the angle of slant will be the same as well. Using anything other than true 3/4″ plywood will affect this.

DOWNLOAD – Milky’s Bomb Droppin’ Box Instructions

Design by Cornhole Game Players Forum member Milky. These cornhole board building instructions used with permission from Cornhole Game Players. For a version you can download and print, please visit the Cornhole Building page.